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  1. page home edited The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education Edition Wiki ... (ELI), an EDUCUASE EDUCAU…

    The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education Edition Wiki
    ...
    (ELI), an EDUCUASEEDUCAUSE Program.
    The report was released officially in February 2014 at the EDUCAUSE ELI Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana.
    What's New?
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Thursday, March 27

  1. page home edited ... Introduction to the Horizon Project Wiki The Sandbox was our primary work area, where you wil…
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    Introduction to the Horizon Project Wiki
    The Sandbox was our primary work area, where you will find links to the areas in which we were actively engaged. You will see it change as we moved through the various processes involved in sorting through the technologies and issues we dealt with as we made our way to the final list that we featured in the NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education Edition.
    ...
    where we are doingdid our work
    STATUS : The Advisory Board reviewed these resources as part of their background research and marked those they considered important references with their wiki signature.
    Emerging Technologies
    ...
    Miscellanea -- Stories, Examples, Food for Thought
    Essays and Interviews on the Future
    ...
    where we will dodid our work
    STATUS : The Advisory Board entered responses to the research questions listed below. Follow any of the links below to get started.
    Research Question 1: Which of the key technologies will be most important to teaching, learning, or creative inquiry in higher education worldwide within the next five years?
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  2. page home edited ... The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education Edition Wiki Welcome to the workspace for t…
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    The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education Edition Wiki
    Welcome to the workspace for the flagship report of the Horizon Project. This wiki is a place for the members of the Horizon Project Advisory Board to manage the selection process for the topics included in the NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education Edition, which is published by the New Media Consortium (NMC) in collaboration with the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI), an EDUCUASE Program.
    The report will bewas released officially
    What's New?
    It's here, it's here! Download the final NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education Edition.
    ...
    Review the timeline...
    Introduction to the Horizon Project Wiki
    The Sandbox iswas our primary
    ...
    which we arewere actively engaged.
    ...
    as we movemoved through the
    ...
    issues we will dealdealt with as we makemade our way
    ...
    list that we'll featurewe featured in the
    Horizon Report Sandbox -- where we are doing our work
    ...
    Advisory Board has been reviewingreviewed these resources
    ...
    research and is markingmarked those they considerconsidered important references
    Emerging Technologies
    Challenges and Trends
    ...
    Essays and Interviews on the Future
    Horizon Report Research Questions -- where we will do our work
    ...
    Advisory Board is actively enteringentered responses to
    Research Question 1: Which of the key technologies will be most important to teaching, learning, or creative inquiry in higher education worldwide within the next five years?
    Research Question 2: What key technologies are missing from our list?
    ...
    Research Question 4: What do you see as the key challenges related to teaching, learning, or creative inquiry that higher education institutions worldwide will face during the next 5 years?
    Additional Resources -- new information that may be germane to our decisions
    ...
    Advisory Board is continually monitoringmonitored the resources
    Horizon Project Navigator Explore the NMC's research service for all Horizon Projects; the library of readings and news stories is continually updated,
    Selected RSS Feeds Browse our collection of dynamically updated news from more than 75 leading resources
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  3. page Wireless Power edited What is Wireless Power? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]] Anyo…

    What is Wireless Power?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]
    Anyone who attends a class or meeting where most of the participants have laptop computers is well aware that there are never enough power outlets—and when they are available, they are invariably located in inconvenient places. Wireless power, already being prototyped by several companies, promises to alleviate the problem by making power for charging batteries in devices readily available. Using near-field inductive coupling, power can be transmitted through special surfaces or even through open space to charge devices within a home, office, school, or other setting. Consumer products are already entering the market; the Powermat, for instance, charges up to three devices placed onto its surface (each device must first be slipped into a compatible sleeve). Fulton Innovation's eCoupled technology is designed to be built into desk- and countertops, enabling not only power transfer but other wireless communications between devices placed on the surfaces. Witricity is developing transmitters that would be embedded in walls or other furniture, transferring power via inductive coupling to receivers attached to devices anywhere within the home or classroom. The impact of wireless power for education will primarily be felt in learning spaces; the devices we carry will become more useful and easier to maintain, with increased opportunity for longer use in a variety of settings.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Sam Nov 1, 2011
    1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    International Agency of the Power Matters Alliance is the authority on the topic of wireless power. cchandler Oct 27, 2013cchandler
    http://www.powermatters.org/
    http://www.powermatters.org/menuless/303-pma-announces-world-class-global-certification-program
    add your response here
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    add your response here
    add your response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on higher education?
    There doesn't appear to be evidence that the research in education is occurring. Many brick and mortar institutions are not wired for charging multiple devices. cchandler Oct 27, 2013cchandler
    add your response here
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    add your response here
    add your response here
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link"]]

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  4. page WhatsNew edited What's New? We're done! Download the NMC Horizon Report > 2012 Higher Education Edition! Th…

    What's New?
    We're done! Download the NMC Horizon Report > 2012 Higher Education Edition!
    The votes are in! You have selected the top emerging technologies, trends, and challenges. Check out the Preview here! {2012-Horizon.HE-Preview.pdf}
    The NMC Horizon Project Shortlist > 2012 Higher Education Edition {2012-Horizon.HE-Shortlist.pdf} is ready!
    The wiki is now open! Welcome Advisory Board members -- please introduce yourselves via the discussion tab on the wiki main page. If you are new to using this kind of wiki, see our Getting Started guide.

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  5. page Web Aggregation Tools edited What are Web Aggregation Tools? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"…

    What are Web Aggregation Tools?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav" ]]
    Aggregation is the process of transparently gathering together distributed pieces of online content based on an interest in the topic(s), the author(s), or other shared characteristics. RSS readers are one way to aggregate data, but with the increase in personal publishing, new tools for aggregation are emerging. Using these tools, readers can easily track a distributed conversation that takes place across blogs, Twitter, and other publishing platforms, as well as pull in relevant resources from news feeds and other sources. Some educators and students are seeking alternatives to course management systems, preferring to open their discussions and make use of a variety of tools instead. Aggregation can reunite course discussions that once took place within CMS forums, even if they are scattered among different platforms and tools. Aggregation can allow a class to visualize its conversations in new ways. Information is available when and where the reader wishes, in almost any desired format.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: alan Jan 27, 2010
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    your response here
    another response here
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    your response here
    another response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on teaching, learning, or creative expression?
    your response here
    another response here
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link" ]]

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  6. page Wearable Technology edited What is Wearable Technology? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]] …

    What is Wearable Technology?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]
    Wearable technology refers to devices that can be worn by users, taking the form of an accessory such as jewelry, sunglasses, a backpack, or even actual items of clothing like shoes or a jacket. Often discreet, a person who comes into contact with someone wearing a device may not even realize that the article of clothing is a piece of technology. The benefit of wearable technology is that it can conveniently integrate tools, devices, power needs, and connectivity within a user’s everyday life and movements. Google's Project Glass features one of the most talked about current examples —the device resembles a pair of glasses but with a single lens. A user can literally see information about their surroundings displayed in front of them, such as the names of friends who are in close proximity, or nearby places to access data that would be relevant to a research project. Wearable technology is still very new, but one can easily imagine accessories such as gloves that enhance the user’s ability to feel or control something they are not directly touching. Wearable technology already in the market includes clothing that charges batteries via decorative solar cells, allows interactions with a user’s devices via sewn in controls or touch pads, or collects data on a person's exercise regimen from sensors embedded in the heels of their shoes.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Sam Nov 1, 2011
    (1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    Wearable technology like Google Glass has a very strong possibility of extending the mobility of learning, further connecting learners to each other as well as to those facilitating their learning, and serving as another collaborative learning tool that can be integrated into the learning process at many levels. With the anticipated release of Google Glass to the general public within the next year, we will probably see quite a bit of experimentation as well as lots of very lively discussion about the benefits and the challenges wearable technology might produce. There are already numerous articles about Google Glass in general and its potential impact on the world of learning. A couple that strike me as particularly worth skimming: an extensive general user review, by Tim Stevens, beginning on p. 45 of issue #89 of Distro at //tinyurl.com/ckwoewp and Charlie Osborne's article "Is Google Glass Suitable for the Classroom" with a great infographic on the ZDNet site athttp://www.zdnet.com/is-google-glass-suitable-for-schools-7000019634/. One other great resource: the Google+ "Google Glass in Education" community at
    https://plus.google.com/communities/107609996462187425150.paul.signorelli Oct 11, 2013 Great resources jasonr Oct 15, 2013 Thank for the links [matthew.worwood Oct 17, 2013] A pleasure; glad to learn they were useful.paul.signorelli Oct 18, 2013 lkoster Oct 24, 2013
    Devices like Google Glass can significantly improve how students interact with video tutorials and follow instructor demonstrations. Applications like Remote Desktop could be taken to a whole new level as students follow live presentations to advanced software using their Google Glasses. As their hands are free they can interact with the software that they are learning without having to disengage from one screen in order to access another. The ability of voice control would also allow a student to say 'Stop', implement an instruction, and then say 'Continue' in order to move to the next step. This would be a much smoother process and one that could be applied to a distant learning model as well as a traditional classroom setting. Perhaps a minor point, but I was taking a distant learning course that took place in a virtual world. Because it was live I felt the need to stay engaged in discussions throughout, which was challenging with a six month old in the house. It's exciting to know that I wouldn't have to excuse myself in the event I had to change a dipper. I think the idea of handsfree will only truly be appreciated once we begin utilizing the technology [matthew.worwood Oct 17, 2013]
    To reach it's full potential, Google glass and similar devices will need to be true augmented reality devices. It's a good first step but is still only a hint of what will follow in a few more years. andrew.barras Oct 17, 2013 lkoster Oct 24, 2013
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    It's more than just wearable. National Taiwan University have developed a sensor that indicates activity inside your mouth, which includes eating, drinking, talking, smoking, breathing, coughing and more.http://www.trendhunter.com/trends/smart-tooth-sensors michael.lambert Oct 19, 2013 Agreed, while I haven't sampled Galaxy Gear in-depth I understand that its possible to have a conversation without having to even hold the device close to your mouth. [matthew.worwood Oct 27, 2013].
    Add a theme here.
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on higher education?
    Wearable technology could easily become an extremely useful tool supporting learning at many levels and will also undoubtedly create many challenges, including the privacy concerns that are already receiving abundant attention among those writing about Google Glass and concerns about how it might interfere with the learning process as we currently know and experience it, as noted in this report in the University of Arizona campus newspaper: http://www.wildcat.arizona.edu/article/2013/09/google-glass-could-alter-learning-classrooms.paul.signorelli Oct 11, 2013 Paul brings up a good point regarding privacy. Students are already starting record lessons with iPads and other devices. Schools will have to consider implementing policies around posting/sharing videos recorded in class if they don't already have them. lkoster Oct 24, 2013
    As access to the technology grows and new applications become readily available I think it will be interesting to see if wearable technology will stake its claim in BYOD and potentially lead to a new acronym WYOD (wear your own device). As wearable technology would consume less space than current devices I think its impact on classroom furniture will be exciting. I continue to believe that it will improve small group collaboration, allowing users to stay engaged in the same space, while accessing online content. From my experience mobile devices encourage students to disengage with a group, looking down into the palm of their hands and braking eye contact. Often if a student wishes to share something they have to physically get up and crowd around a small device. How exciting would it be for a group of students to stare in the same space, giggling, laughing and appreciating each other’s gestures, while accessing online media/resources from the same perspective wherever they’re sitting. [matthew.worwood Oct 17, 2013]
    Wearable technology allows easy access to information in a fairly seamless way anywhere. It will allow us to do casual learning outside the classroom. It will also be a valuable content creation device with the built in video camera. On a related note, how will professors deal with a classroom of students, each pointing a camera at them possible streaming their lecture to the outside world? andrew.barras Oct 17, 2013 lkoster Oct 24, 2013
    Informal learning curriculum is somewhat beginning to take the lead away from the 'old' required course structure. Wearable technology can support informal learning...opening up personalized learning, allowing students to design their own coursework, creating courses with more a 'open lab' component, etc. michael.lambert Oct 19, 2013
    continues to erode the traditional classroom and the authority of the traditional instructor, creating new opportunities as well as a significant change-management problem. Telling students to "close the laptop" or "put away your phone" becomes meaningless when the technology merges with the individual student. amichaelberman Oct 23, 2013
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    add your response here
    add your response here
    Please share information about related projects in our Horizon Project sharing form

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  7. page Watch Lists edited [[include component="page" page="PressClippingsNav"]] Press Clippings: Publis…
    [[include component="page" page="PressClippingsNav"]]
    Press Clippings: Published Technologies to Watch Lists
    This area is a place to collect "Technologies to Watch" lists published by other organizations.
    Though these lists and publications may serve a different audience and purpose than the Horizon Report does, they contain many useful descriptions and discussions that can and should inform our work.
    We'd love to see your clippings here as well! Please use the edit this page button to add more, or add comments on how or why you think they may or may not be important. As is the convention throughout the Horizon Project Wiki, we ask you to identify items you think are of high interest to us, as I have done here by typing 4 tilde (~) characters-- Sam Apr 14, 2011 (note - to keep the wiki clean, please put spaces on either side of your marks). This will help us to sift through the articles and determine which ones resonate most strongly with the board as a whole.
    Recommended Reading
    CEA: 5 Technology Trends to Watch
    http://content.ce.org/PDF/2K13_5tech_proof.pdf
    In October, the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) released their annual list of technologies that are expected to influence the consumer electronics industry in the next few years. I agree with most of these technologies and have heard first hand from our students from Tanzania and Kenya about the importance of mobile devices, especially cell phones for communication and the deployment of education.
    15 Current Technologies A Child Born Today Will Never Use
    http://news.yahoo.com/15-current-technologies-child-born-today-never-142409696.html
    This article predicts what the future landscape will look like and which technologies will become obsolete in that landscape, many of which, have been a huge part of our own lives in a way that our kids will never experience. - Interesting by way of a "non-trend" or "Technologies not to Watch List helga Oct 4, 2013 lkoster Oct 7, 2013 Sorry--not entirely buying this. Which children, from what backgrounds and from where? And when? The overall landscape + 10-15 ys from now isn't going to look *that* different from today. jasonr Oct 7, 2013Holly.Lu Oct 15, 2013
    5 Tech Trends That Will Change Gaming Forever
    http://mashable.com/2013/06/19/gaming-tech-trends/
    This year’s E3 Expo showed off the newest technology intended to enhance the gaming experience. Mashable highlights the five trends they expect to change gaming in the next few years. jasonr Oct 7, 2013
    FORRESTER'S TOP 15 EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES TO WATCH: NOW TO 2018
    http://blogs.forrester.com/brian_hopkins/13-02-07-forresters_top_15_emerging_technologies_to_watch_now_to_2018
    Forrester released its top 15 emerging technologies to watch after examining how today’s hot technology create platforms for future disruption. Topics include sensors and remote computing technologies and process data management technologies. helga Oct 4, 2013 jochen.robes Oct 7, 2013 jasonr Oct 7, 2013
    Seven Technologies to Disrupt the Next Decade
    http://www.newscientist.com/special/seven-technologies-to-disrupt-the-decade
    New Scientist picks the ideas, concepts and gadgets that are set to shake things up in the next decade. helga Oct 4, 2013 lkoster Oct 7, 2013 jasonr Oct 7, 2013
    10 Breakthrough Technologies of 2013
    http://www.technologyreview.com/lists/breakthrough-technologies/2013/
    The MIT Technology Review released its annual list of technologies they believe will expand the scope of human possibilities from smart watches to deep learning and memory implants. helga Oct 4, 2013 rudolf.mumenthaler Oct 16, 2013
    32 Innovations That Will Change Your Tomorrow
    http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2012/06/03/magazine/innovations-issue.html
    This article lists inventions and advancements that are being studied and created, from a mind-reading shopping cart to tooth sensors that can detect plaque-building bacteria and notify us. Fun to read and think about. michael.lambert Oct 6, 2013Holly.Lu Oct 15, 2013
    12 Technologies That Are Improving At Insane Speeds
    http://www.businessinsider.com/mckinsey-disruptive-technology-report-2013-6
    McKinsey recently released a report on the 12 technologies that are disrupting the global economy, from advanced robotics and next-generation genomics to self-driving cars. A chart from the report is featured in this article, showing how fast these technologies are getting better. lkoster Oct 7, 2013
    12 Tech Trends Higher Education Cannot Afford to Ignore
    http://www.educationdive.com/news/12-tech-trends-higher-education-cannot-afford-to-ignore/156188/
    Lev Gonick, the VP for information technology services and CIO at Case Western Reserve University and CEO of OneCommunity lays out important points concerning the future of education and campus IT. helga Oct 4, 2013 lkoster Oct 7, 2013Holly.Lu Oct 15, 2013 rudolf.mumenthaler Oct 16, 2013
    What Will Be Obsolete in 2020? (video)
    http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2012/03/what-will-be-obsolete-in-2020/
    This video voices perspectives of teachers, entrepreneurs and policymakers who attended Big ideas Fest, an event focused on transformational change in education.The interviewees each discuss the aspects of current classrooms that they believe will be obsolete in 2020. - Again, interesting by way of a "non-trend" or "Technologies not to Watch List helga Oct 4, 2013

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  8. page Volumetric and Holographic Displays edited What are Volumetric and Holographic Displays? [[include component="page" page="T…

    What are Volumetric and Holographic Displays?
    [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]]
    One of the long anticipated innovations to stem from the rapid progression of technology has been holographic or volumetric displays, also referred to as 3D displays. Since 2005, researchers have been working toward creating practical uses for holography, and the aggregated attempts of these developers over the years have turned 3D visuals into an experience that can be facilitated by a personal mobile device. MIT's Media Lab produced a holographic projector that employs a spatial light modulator (SLM), the central component of digital holography, to create a holographic video. As these technologies continue to be refined, it won't be long before consumers will have the option of purchasing devices with holographic capabilities, an advancement that will be accompanied by a offering of downloadable media files in 3D formats.
    INSTRUCTIONS: Enter your responses to the questions below. This is most easily done by moving your cursor to the end of the last item and pressing RETURN to create a new bullet point. Please include URLs whenever you can (full URLs will automatically be turned into hyperlinks; please type them out rather than using the linking tools in the toolbar).
    Please "sign" your contributions by marking with the code of 4 tildes (~) in a row so that we can follow up with you if we need additional information or leads to examples- this produces a signature when the page is updated, like this: Larry Feb 8, 2012
    1) How might this technology be relevant to the educational sector you know best?
    Holographic video conferencing, initially with a small number of participants, but his could enhance small group tutorial sessions. j.zagami Oct 23, 2013
    add your response here
    (2) What themes are missing from the above description that you think are important?
    Research and workplace observation via holographic video analysis could provide a richer remote experience of work environments for student observation or research analysis. j.zagami Oct 23, 2013
    add your response here
    (3) What do you see as the potential impact of this technology on higher education?
    Initial experimentation into teleconferencing and small online courses, with research into the effectiveness of the technology for improved engagement and experiential learning, particularly in environments where student physical observations would be intrusive.j.zagami Oct 23, 2013
    add your response here
    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    Microsoft holographic skype http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/move-over-hologram-tupac-microsoft-reportedly-working-on-3d-holographic-avatars-for-skype/ j.zagami Oct 23, 2013
    Kinect holographic systems http://www.hml.queensu.ca/blog/telehuman j.zagami Oct 23, 2013
    [[include component="page" page="Project Form Link"]]

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